Plug vs pump – an electric car cost comparison

 

EVs versus hybrids | Charging EVs | Advantages

Buying an EV

We’ll come right out and say it - at this stage, electric cars are more expensive to buy than petrol ones. You’ll make the savings in the long term, rather than right off the bat.

However, the upfront cost is definitely decreasing. And don’t forget about secondhand options, too. Here we’ve laid out some popular electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids in New Zealand, and what you’re looking at to buy them new and secondhand.

Electric vehicles

Model

Cost to buy new
(latest model)

Fully electric range

Secondhand cost
(model dependent)

Nissan Leaf

$59,990

270km

From around $8,000

Volkswagen e-Golf

$64,490

220km

From around $45,000

Hyundai Ioniq

$65,990

311km

From around $40,000

Renault Zoe

$68,990

300km

From around $30,000

BMW i3 electric

$77,200

260km

From around $30,000

Hyundai Kona

$77,990

449km

From around $60,000

Tesla Model 3

$79,990

460km

N/A

Tesla Model S

$154,900

610km

From around $85,000

Mitsubishi I-Miev

N/A

160km

From around $15,000

Costs as at May 2020. New costs direct from the manufacturer. Secondhand costs using TradeMe Classifieds.

Plug-in hybrids

Model

Cost to buy new
(latest model)

Fully electric range

Secondhand cost
(model dependent)

Mitsubishi Outlander

$52,490

55km

From around $20,000

BMW i3 PHEV

$78,700

200km

From around  $40,000

Mini Countryman

$59,990

47km

N/A

Audi A3 

$71,500

50km

N/A

Hyundai Ioniq

$53,990

52km

N/A

Toyota Prius Prime 

$47,490

63km

From around $15,000

Costs as at May 2020. New costs direct from the manufacturer. Secondhand costs using TradeMe Classifieds.

Cost to charge an EV

Charging an EV costs the equivalent of around $0.30/litre of petrol - which is where some pretty epic savings come in.

The Ministry of Transport reckons the average car in New Zealand travels around 11,500 kilometres per year. If that’s you, you’re looking at about $300* in annual charging costs on our Electric Car Plan. It’s designed just for EV drivers - essentially, you get cheaper rates for charging overnight. It’s our way of saying thanks for choosing to drive electric and helping take better care of our environment.

ELECTRIC CAR PLAN

*Based on a 2015 Nissan Leaf.

Maintenance

Maintaining an electric car is a whole lot easier when you don’t have a combustion engine to deal with. While a standard petrol vehicle has roughly 2,000 moving parts to keep oiled and serviced, a fully-electric car has about 20. It doesn’t need oil and rarely needs servicing, so the main thing to consider is the potential cost of replacing your battery. It always pays to check what guarantees the manufacturer is offering on their batteries - you might find you’re covered for up to 10 years.

So what’s the verdict?

While you’re paying more upfront for an electric vehicle, chances are you’ll be saving money from that point onwards. No petrol costs, currently no Road User Charges and minimal maintenance costs all help make driving electric way easier on the wallet.